Family: Asteraceae




Part Used:


Buds of Flowers MOST EFFECTIVE EMBRYONIC ARNICA EVER!

NOTE: These indications are only for use with embryonic plant stem cell tissues. Adult plants do not have the same constituents, actions or applications in most cases.

Common names : Mountain Tobacco, Mountain Arnica, Common Arnica, Leopard's Bane and Sneezewort.
Arnica is a genus with about 30 perennial, herbaceous species, belonging to the sunflower family (Asteraceae). The genus name Arnica may be derived from the Greek arna, "lamb", in reference to the soft, hairy leaves. Arnica has been used for medicinal purposes since the 1500s and remains popular today. It is a perennial plant that grows to a height of 1 - 2 feet with yellow-orange flowers similar to daisies. It is native to the mountains of Europe and Siberia, and is cultivated in North America.

This circumboreal and montane genus occurs mostly in the temperate regions of western North America, while two are native to Eurasia (A. angustifolia and A. montana). Arnica is considered a classical medicinal plant.
Arnica, which has always been so favorite a medicament with the homoeopaths, is a remedy much older than homoeopathy, and some of the most valuable evidence in its favor has been given by non-homoeopathic physicians. Among the most interesting of these testimonies is that of Schroder Van der Kolk, who employed it largely in the form of infusion of the flowers and of decoction of the root.

A very important question, as to what are the active ingredients in arnica since great mistakes have been occasioned by erroneous views. The active ingredient long supposed to be of most consequence is arnicine, C20H30O4, a bitter principle, which is insoluble in water, but freely soluble in alcohol and in ether, and forms amorphous masses of a golden yellow color; or else the ethereal oil, which is also insoluble in water. It is now probable that neither arnicine nor the oil, but "trimethylamine," is the really useful ingredient of arnica. Trimethylamine, N(CH3)3, is a clear, colorless fluid, which boils at a very low temperature, and then emits a fishy smell. It is quite freely soluble in water, in alcohol, and in ether, and its vapor is absorbed by water with great avidity. It has a strong alkaline reaction, and readily ignites, on the application of flame, even when diluted with an equal quantity of water.


Oligo-elements:


K, Su, Si.


Vitamins and Minerals:


Calcium, Choline.


Phytochemical Constituents:


Angelic Acid, Arnicin (alkaloid) up to 4 %, Arnicolide, Arnidiol, Astragaline, Auxins (IAA), Beta-Sitosterol, Betaine, Brassinosteroids (BR), Caffeic-Acid, Chlorogenic Acid, Cytokinins (CK), Dihydrophelenalin, Eupafolin, Faradiol, Florigen (flower-inducing hormone), Fumaric Acid, Gallic Acid, Gibberellins (GA), Sesquiterpene Lactones Helenalin, Helenien, Hispidulin, Hydroxycinnamoylquinic acids, Inulin, Isobutyric Acid,Isorhamnetin, Isoquercitrin, Jasmonic acid (JA), Kaempferol, Lactic Acid, Lauric Acid, Lutein, Luteolin, Malic Acid, Mucilage, Meristems plant stem cells (PSC), Palmitic Acid, Patuletin, Pectolin-arigenin, Phytosterols, Quercetin, Salicylates (SA), Scopoletin, Spinacetin, Stearic Acid, Sucrose, Taraxasterol, Thymol, Tricin, Trimethylamine, Umbelliferone, Xanthophyll, Zeaxanthin. A novel melanin inhibitor: hydroperoxy traxastane-type triterpene from flowers of Arnica montana. Three new 1, 5- trans-guaianolides, of which 11alpha, 13-dihydro-2-O-tigloylflorilenalin and the respective 2-O-isovaleryl derivative are reported for the first time. Additionally, three new and one known 2beta-ethoxy-2, 3-dihydrohelenalin esters were isolated.


Plant Stem Cell Therapy Indications:

Polycrest All!



Dermatology


External Bruises and Cuts, arnica is undoubtedly very useful. Melanin inhibitor. Acne, hair loss if rubbed on scalp, inflammation from insect bites.


Musculoskeletal System


Sprains, Muscle Aches, Overexertion or Trauma, Rheumatism, Rheumatic Gout, Rheumatic Fever, joint-pain and the fever arrested in a single day's treatment. Arthritis, Inflammations of the Serous Membranes. Strained or pulled muscles and tendons. For topical application better than any other arnica product in the world. I have known many Arnica extracts in my lifetime but never one has effective as this one! And when combined with embryonic St John’s Wort (buds of flowers) yield unbelievable results topically.


GI – Digestive – Hepatology


Exhausting diarrhea and general cachexia which is loss of weight, muscle atrophy, fatigue, weakness and significant loss of appetite in someone who is not actively trying to lose weight are also checked by arnica with great certainty. Dosage: PO 1-3 drops 3 x a day. A compress on the stomach to relieve abdominal pains.


Psychiatry


Idiopathic mania where the first excitement having diminished, the head nevertheless remains hot, and where a tendency to imbecility or to paralysis is shown. Po for this condition 1 drop 3 x a day into an entire glass of distilled water and sip thru out the day.


ENT/Pulmonary


In Hemorrhages arising from mechanical violence, bleeding from the nose epitasis, and hemoptysis (coughing up of blood or of blood-stained sputum from the bronchi, larynx, trachea, or lungs), arnica is also of great service; and the same may be said of pulmonary congestions arising from fractured ribs. Aphthas are small painful ulcers that appear in the mucosa of oral cavity. All the results found in this study reinforce the potent anti-inflammatory and cicatrisation activity of arnica on the repair process of lesions in oral mucosa, and suggest that pharmacological preparations containing arnica facilitate this process.

Dosage: for this PO 3-6 drops 3 x a day.


Ophthalmology


Amaurosis which is vision loss or weakness that occurs without an apparent lesion affecting the eye, for which disorder it has long been a popular remedy in Germany. Leber's congenital amaurosis is an inherited disease resulting in optic atrophy and secondary severe vision loss or blindness. It was first described by Theodore Leber in the 19th century. Amaurosis fugax (Latin: fugax meaning fugitive) is a temporary loss of vision in one eye caused by decreased blood flow (ischemia) to the retina. Another cause is the presence of emboli located in the ipsilateral (same side) internal carotid artery. It is a type of transient ischaemic attack (TIA). Those experiencing Amaurosis usually experience complete symptom abeyance within a few minutes. In a small minority of those who experience Amaurosis, stroke or vision loss has resulted. Diabetes, hypertension and smoking are factors known to increase the risks of suffering this condition. It also can be the result of surgical repair to the mitral valve, when very small emboli may break away from the site of the repair, while the patient's tissue grows to cover the plastic Annuloplasty band. Dosage: for this condition PO 1 drop 3 x a day.


Cardio Vascular & Circulatory System


For Internal Bruises, arnica is a most excellent remedy, neutralizing the ill effects of blows, falls, and other mechanical injuries. Ecchymosis and sanguineous effusions are rapidly dispersed by it, provided the medicine is administered shortly after the injury has been sustained. In cases of shake, concussion, and shock, resulting from accidents, it is also very serviceable. Under these circumstances I recommend that 1 to 3 drops be taken every 2 or 3 hours in a glassful of water. I believe there is no drug that can so well restore the contused muscular fiber to its healthy condition in a short space of time as arnica; and I consider it a great pity that it has not come into more general use in cases of this description. When used after amputations, arnica certainly has the power of uniting the surfaces very rapidly. An experienced clinician may recommend arnica as an herbal remedy for senile heart, angina, or coronary artery disease. Raises blood pressure, especially in the coronary arteries and increased circulation.


Neurological/Urogenital:


Shock, In cases of concussion of the brain, induced by a fall, I cannot speak too highly of it. In Paralytic Affections of various kinds, arnica has been found useful by numerous observers, among who are Alibert and Meyer, who by means of it cured paralyzed bladder. Dosage: PO 1-3 drops 3 x a day.


Surgery:


Plastic surgery or any type of surgery will speed up the time of recovery invaluable. In one double-blind trial, Arnica montana was found to be equally effective as the more expensive diclofenac for accelerating wound healing after foot surgery, but was less effective than the same drug for pain relief. A study of wound-healing after surgery to treat varicose veins found a trend towards a beneficial effect of reduction of pain and hematoma following surgery. Dosage: PO 1-3 drops 3 x a day also topically but only days after the incisions have completely healed and then stop the oral treatment.


Dental:


Arnica is useful as a gargle for mouth and gum infections. The methanol extract of Arnica Montana embryonic buds of flower had a better antibacterial activity than the decoction (with MICs two or three times lower). The inhibiting concentrations of the methanol extract against P. gingivalis (3 of 5 strains), Prevotella spp., E. corrodens, Peptostreptococcus spp. And Actinomyces spp. had acceptable values (MIC ≤ 2048 mg/L) for the use in mouthwashes for the correct hygiene of the oral cavity. C. gingivalis and V. parvula (MIC 4096 mg/L) were less sensitive and so was F. nucleatum (MIC 16384 mg/L). Mid level validity for wounds.


Immunological-Hematology-Oncology-Infectious disease:


Helenalin is a sesquiterpene lactone with potent anti-inflammatory and antitumor effects found in Arnica Montana and Arnica chamissonis foliosa. It is the main compound responsible for the therapeutic effects of Arnica. Keep blood clots from forming. Arnica stimulates the circulation and the immune functions of the mucous membranes.
While it is not completely known how sesquiterpene lactones exert their anti-inflammatory effect, helenalin has been shown to selectively inhibit the transcription factor NF-κB, which plays a key role in regulating immune response, through a unique mechanism. In vitro, it is also a potent, selective inhibitor of human telomerase which may partially account for its antitumor effects—has anti-trypanosomal activity, and is toxic to Plasmodium falciparum. Dosage PO 1-3 drops 3 x a day.
Arnica contains a group of polysaccharides with 65% to 100% galacturonic acid that can inhibit the complement system, thereby modifying the immune system response. This polysaccharide displays marked phagocytosis enhancement in vivo.
Animal and in vitro studies have also suggested that helenalin can reduce the growth of Staphylococcus aureus and reduce the severity of S. aureus infection. Helenalin is a highly toxic compound but the amount found in the embryonic prevents any possible toxicity.

External preparations of Arnica should always be extremely diluted the fact that the embryonic extract is macerated already in glycerin does not poses the same problems as adult arnica and should be used full strength. Dosage: 3-5 drops 2 to 4 x a day depending on severity. It helps to regenerate the tissue and is suitable for the treatment of all injuries resulting from impact, falls, stabs and cuts.
  • Poultices/Compresses - dilute tincture/extract 1-5 times with water
  • Oil (infused with vegetable oil) for massage.
  • Mouthwash - dilute tincture/extract 2-5 times with water. (Do not swallow) unless prescribed by a professional.


Interactions With Drugs


In theory, arnica may increase the risk of bleeding when used with anticoagulants (blood thinners) or antiplatelet drugs. Examples include warfarin (Coumadin), heparin and clopidogrel (Plavix). Some pain relievers may also increase the risk of bleeding if used with arnica. Examples include aspirin, ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil) and naproxen (Naprosyn, Aleve, Anaprox). Use of arnica with other pain-relieving medications may increase the analgesic effects. It is possible that arnica may decrease the effectiveness of drugs used to lower blood pressure. Theoretically, arnica may cause a decrease in the protein binding of drugs that are highly protein bound. Arnica may have additive effects with corticosteroids.


Contraindication : with other herbs or dietary supplements


In theory, arnica may increase the risk of bleeding when taken with products such as White Willow, Dogwood, Ginkgo biloba and garlic (Allium sativum). Use of arnica with other pain-relieving agents may increase the analgesic effects which can be desirable. Discourage the concurrent use of acetaminophen with arnica.

Arnica may interact with herb or supplements with anesthetic effects, steroid effects, or anti-inflammatory effects. Use with arnica may reduce effectiveness of blood pressure-lowering herbs and supplements. Arnica used with daisy (Bellis perennis) may reduce postpartum blood loss.

Arnica montana contains the toxin helenalin, which can be poisonous if large amounts of the plant are eaten, and contact with the plant can also cause skin irritation. If enough of the material is ingested, the toxin helenalin produces severe gastroenteritis, and internal bleeding of the digestive tract.

Helenalin.jpg

Helenalin is a sesquiterpene lactone with potent anti-inflammatory and antitumor effects found in Arnica montana and Arnica chamissonis foliosa. It is the main compound responsible for the therapeutic effects of Arnica.
While it is not completely known how sesquiterpene lactones exert their anti-inflammatory effect, helenalin has been shown to selectively inhibit the transcription factor NF-κB, which plays a key role in regulating immune response, through a unique mechanism. In vitro, it is also a potent, selective inhibitor of human telomerase which may partially account for its antitumor effects—has anti-trypanosomal activity, and is toxic to Plasmodium falciparum.
Animal and in vitro studies have also suggested that helenalin can reduce the growth of Staphylococcus aureus and reduce the severity of S. aureus infection. Helenalin is a highly toxic compound.


Anti-inflammatory and immune-regulatory mechanisms prevent contact hypersensitivity to Arnica montana L.


Full Abstract
Sesquiterpene lactones (SL), secondary plant metabolites from flower heads of Arnica, exert anti-inflammatory effects mainly by preventing nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB activation because of alkylation of the p65 subunit. Despite its known immunosuppressive action, Arnica has been classified as a plant with strong potency to induce allergic contact dermatitis. Here we examined the dual role of SL as anti-inflammatory compounds and contact allergens in vitro and in vivo. We tested the anti-inflammatory and allergenic potential of SL in the mouse contact hypersensitivity model. We also used dendritic cells to study the activation of NF-kappaB and the secretion of interleukin (IL)-12 in the presence of different doses of SL in vitro. Arnica tinctures and SL potently suppressed NF-kappaB activation and IL-12 production in dendritic cells at high concentrations, but had immunostimulatory effects at low concentrations. Contact hypersensitivity could not be induced in the mouse model, even when Arnica tinctures or SL was applied undiluted to inflamed skin. In contrast, Arnica tinctures suppressed contact hypersensitivity to the strong contact sensitizer trinitrochlorobenzene and activation of dendritic cells. However, contact hypersensitivity to Arnica tincture could be induced in acutely CD4-depleted MHC II knockout mice. These results suggest that induction of contact hypersensitivity by Arnica is prevented by its anti-inflammatory effect and immunosuppression as a result of immune regulation in immunocompetent mice.


Arnica Montana Research


New sesquiterpene lactones from Arnica tincture prepared from fresh flower heads of Arnica montana.

Planta Med. 2005 Nov; 71(11):1044-52.

Arnica flower consists of the fresh or dried inflorescence of A. montana L. or A.chamissonis Less. subsp. foliosa (Nutt.) Maguiere [Fam. Asteraceae], as well as its preparations in effective dosage. It contains sesquiterpene lactones of the helenanolid type, predominantly ester derivatives of helenalin and 11, 13-dihydrohelenalin. Additionally, the herb contains flavonoids (e.g., isoquercitrin, luteolin-7-glucoside, and astragalin), volatile oil (with thymol and its derivatives), phenol carbonic acid (chlorogenic acid, cynarin, caffeic acid), and coumarins (umbelliferone, scopoletin).

The Commission E reports that when applied topically, arnica preparations have antiphlogistic (anti-inflammatory) activity. In cases of inflammation, arnica preparations also show analgesic and antiseptic activity. In animal studies, helenalin and dihydrohelenalin were found to have analgesic, antibiotic, antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory activity (Vanhaelen-Fastr, 1968; 1972; 1973). In vitro experiments concluded that helanalin also works as an immunostimulant (Leung and Foster, 1996).